Battlestar Galactica: Blood on the Scales

A singularly joyless episode warrants a singularly joyless recap. Let’s just get this over with. Adama and Tigh are captured by the mutineers, including Captain Kelly, whom we haven’t seen since his arrest for sabotage last season. Gaeta orders Hot Dog and Narcho to shoot down the Raptor on which Roslin and Baltar are escaping, but Hot Dog hesitates. The Raptor safely reaches the Cylon basestar, where Roslin talks the Cylons -- the Sixes, Twos, and Eights, plus Tory -- out of jumping away from the Galactica. The basestar hides itself among the ships in the fleet.

Gaeta and Zarek want Adama court-martialed, with a reluctant Romo Lampkin heading up his defense. Zarek, meanwhile, secretly murders the entire Quorum, which appalls Gaeta.

Starbuck and Apollo skulk around the Galactica, hurling grenades and shooting people. They spring Helo, Athena, Hera, Tigh, Caprica, and Anders from the brig, but Anders is shot in the neck in the process. Much chaos ensues. Starbuck remains behind with her injured husband while Apollo and the rest try to rescue Adama.

Off in his own isolated subplot, Tyrol becomes all awesome and Die Hard by crawling through an endless numbers of tunnels and vents throughout the Galactica. Eventually, he’s caught climbing into the munitions locker by Kelly. Kelly reminisces about old times and how Cally was a total slut, then lets Tyrol escape.

Gaeta orders Narcho to prepare a firing squad and take Adama down to the launch tube. According to writer Jane Espenson on the webisode commentary, the original plan was to reveal Narcho instead of Hoshi as Gaeta’s lover, which, just based on their interaction this episode, would have actually made more sense; the Gaeta/Hoshi romance in the webisodes seemed a little -- what’s the word? -- random. Also, Narcho is much hotter than Hoshi, so there’s that. By the way, Battlestar Galactica, don’t think it’s passed unnoticed that this is the second time you’ve revealed a gay character to be crazy and evil (hi, Admiral Cain!). It’s the sort of thing you really can get away with only once over the course of a series, if that.

Meanwhile, back on the basestar, Baltar snogs a random brunette Six and feels guilty for deserting his cult (his “fan club,” as he calls them without discernable irony. I heart Baltar. Even in the pit of despair, he brings the funny).

Kelly, who is with the firing squad, breaks down into tears and joins up with Apollo and the gang, who overthrow the mutineers in the launch tube and rescue Adama.

Gaeta orders the fleet to jump away from the Cylon basestar, but Tyrol mucks around in the bowels of the ship and disables the FTL drive. Stranded, Gaeta finally comes to his senses and stands down, just as Adama storms the CIC. Gaeta and Zarek are taken into custody.

In the brig, Gaeta shares a cigarette with Baltar and rambles insanely about how he originally wanted to be an architect and design buildings shaped like food. When Baltar tries to offer some comfort, Gaeta cuts him off and tells him he’s okay with the way things turned out.

Zarek and Gaeta are taken in front of a firing squad. As Adama gives the command to fire, Gaeta looks at the stump of his amputated leg and realizes that, for the first time, it’s stopped hurting.

There's still, what, six episodes left until the end of the series, but I'm out of it. Not to get all melodramatic or anything, but the season thus far has been nasty and spiteful, and I'm simply not enjoying it. I despise the characters, with the possible exception of cheery scuzzball Baltar, and, with Gaeta's death, I have zero emotional investment remaining in anyone. Watching this season has been a bit of an ordeal, and life is short.

Comments

Kyle said…
Tyrol staring at the wall: were there stars visible through it? If so, that would indicate that skin-jobs don't need air (though Boomer's sleeper swimming in 33 Minutes, the first episode of the series proper, would point to something similar).
Morgan Richter said…
I didn't see stars, though I was watching it on a tiny laptop screen, so you may very well be right. I just saw a big, honking, scary crack in the hull. Not a good sign for the Galactica.
Jason Gilman said…
I'm kind of surprised by the lack of comments, but maybe there were a lot of heartbroken Gaeta fans out there. I came away from the episode feeling pretty satisfied. Thanks to Gaeta's efforts the last two episodes were actually entertaining. As much as I'd rather not see internal conflict, BSG is at its best when its cast of characters are at death's door and somehow claw their way back out. But with the mutiny thwarted, something new better happen quickly to maintain the momentum (a cracked Galactica on its last legs?) otherwise Morgan won't be the only one abandoning ship.
Morgan Richter said…
I'm kind of surprised by the lack of comments, but maybe there were a lot of heartbroken Gaeta fans out there.

Heh. Or people are finding my total and complete lack of humor about the episode somewhat off-putting. Whichever. I dunno -- I've just experienced kind of a sea change with BSG over the past month or so, where the problems I'd been having with the show over the last couple of seasons suddenly made watching the show seem like more trouble than it's worth. I seem to have limited patience these days for people deliberately setting out to make misery for others, and that's been BSG in a nutshell.

Also, Gaeta was hot. And now he's dead.
Dan said…
Kelly reminisces about old times and how Cally was a total slut, then lets Tyrol escape.

I'm sorry, but I must insert one of those godawful 'LOL's right here.

Kudos, my friend. You may have abandoned BSG, but at least you went out with a bang.
Morgan Richter said…
You may have abandoned BSG, but at least you went out with a bang.

Excellent. Just like Mr. Gaeta.
Jason Gilman said…
It's not a full recap of the next episode, but if anyone still wants to discuss their BSG theories in light of the revelations in latest episode you can head over to this BSG:No Exit post on my blog.

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